Great Global Warming Swindle – Ofcom update

Ofcom, the UK’s broadcasting regulator, has written to all those who made official complaints about Martin Durkin’s Channel 4 documentary The Great Global Warming Swindle. The purpose of the letter I received yesterday is to update complainants on progress with the investigation, but I’m left somewhat puzzled by its contents. Since the film was first […]

Read More →
Oh Higgs, where art thou?

One of my favourite bloggers, Mick Hartley, has today had a go at that dreadful shower of otherwise unemployable degenerates known as physicists. While I do not have a problem with this per se, Mick has aimed a bit wide of the mark in his attack on particle physics. The “God particle” to which Mick […]

Read More →
Serendipity roves

A mechanical foul-up on one of NASA’s two Mars rovers has led to the serendipitous discovery that water once existed in the Gusev crater, which lies 15 degrees south of the Martian equator. Although the consensus is that Mars was in the distant past a watery place, there is little evidence of water present today […]

Read More →
Saturn transfigured

This stunning photo is of the planet Saturn, backlit by the sun, with Earth appearing as a tiny dot in the upper left quadrant. The picture was taken by a camera attached to the Cassini spacecraft: a joint US and European mission which included the Huygens probe that landed on the moon Titan in January […]

Read More →
Bringing herbal medicine into disrepute

I’ve just learned via a University College London Hospitals (UCLH) press release that the world’s leading professional body for herbal medicine practitioners recently teamed up with the Royal London Homeopathic Hospital (RLHH) to organise a one-day conference to “…share experience of an integrative approach to healthcare…”. What has herbal medicine got to do with homeopathy, […]

Read More →
Engineered nanomaterials and soil ecology

How relevant is ‘nano’ when it comes to the environmental impact of engineered nanomaterials? The potential environmental impact of engineered nanomaterials weighs heavy on the minds of scientists, regulators and industrialists, and there have been a number of studies carried out on specific materials. Results vary, as one would expect in the real world, and […]

Read More →
Nanotechnology could provide a green path to a sustainable economy

In a report aimed primarily at policymakers, the Washington DC-based Project on Emerging Nanotechnologies shows how it is possible to use nanotechnology to reduce pollution, conserve natural resources and create a clean, green and sustainable economy. The report – “Green nanotechnology: it’s easier than you think” – highlights research breakthroughs in green chemistry and engineering, […]

Read More →
IBM brings magnetic resonance imaging to the nanoscale

Researchers at IBM’s Almaden Research Center in California’s Silicon Valley have demonstrated two-dimensional imaging of objects as small as 90 nanometres with magnetic resonance techniques (MRI). The ultimate goal is to use MRI to study individual atoms in three dimensions. While this remains some way off, Dan Rugar and his IBM colleagues say that 50 […]

Read More →
Carbon nanotube arrays for photovoltaic cells and imaging sensors

Inspired by the way in which sunlight reflects off the surfaces of skyscrapers on New York’s Manhattan Island, a group of researchers at the Georgia Tech Research Institute is looking to improve on conventional silicon solar cells and imaging chips by expanding the light-collecting surface from two to three dimensions. Arrays of photovoltaic cells for […]

Read More →
fff