Ceramic tubes could cut greenhouse gas emissions from power stations

Greenhouse gas emissions from gas-fired power stations could be cut to almost zero by controlling the combustion process with a porous membrane made from an advanced ceramic material. So claims a team of engineers led by Ian Metcalfe and Alan Thursfield at Newcastle University, UK. The material in question – LSCF – has previously been […]

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Graphene sniffs out dangerous chemicals

Researchers at the University of Manchester, UK, have used a one-atom thick gauze of carbon atoms known as graphene to build sensors capable of detecting a single molecule of gasses such as alcohol vapour and carbon monoxide. Single molecule detection is the holy grail of sensing technology, but it has until now been impossible owing […]

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Energy saving costs you dear, thanks to the European Commission

The European Commission has caved in to pressure from industry and extended by a year the current 66% import duty on low-energy lightbulbs made in China. This despite the Commission urging European citizens to switch from wasteful filament bulbs. EU trade commissioner Peter Mandelson had previously indicated that the tariff would be scrapped, but intensive […]

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Condemned Kurdish journalists on hunger strike

Further to my 8 August Comment is Free article on two Kurdish men sentenced to hang in Iran, I recently received from UK-based supporters of Adnan Hassanpour and Abdolwahed Boutimar a file of text documents and photos. If there are any Farsi readers of this blog who could take a look at these, please get […]

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200 year old physics experiment with a plasmonics spin

School students the world over learn about the wave nature of light through Thomas Young’s famous double-slit experiment of 1800. In this physics classic, light is allowed to pass through two narrow slits, producing interference fringes on a screen placed behind the slits. Over the years Young’s experiment has been revisited many times, and in […]

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What should we do with nanomaterials at the end of their useful lives?

A new report on nanomaterial waste regulation has just been published by the Washington DC-based Project on Emerging Nanotechnologies (PEN). In “Where Does the Nano Go? End of Life Regulation of Nanotechnologies”, the report’s authors Linda Breggin and John Pendergrass look at how nanomaterials enter the waste stream and find their way into landfills and […]

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Europe plans voluntary code for nanotech research

In it efforts to promote safe and responsible nanotechnology research, the European Commission (EC) is planning to adopt a voluntary code of conduct. The code will take the form of an EC Recommendation inviting member states, industry, research institutes, funding agencies, individual researchers and others to follow its guidelines. The Code of Conduct for Responsible […]

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EPA decides against special treatment for nanomaterials

In a move that left some commentators scratching their heads, the US Environmental Protection Agency stated in its recently published TSCA Inventory Status of Nanoscale Substances paper that it will continue its current practice of regulating nanomaterials on a case-by-case basis. This runs contrary to numerous research studies that show marked differences in the biological […]

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Challenging Russia – Offshore Technology

The following is an excerpt from an article commissioned by SPG Media for the Offshore-Technology.com website, and published there yesterday in a slightly different form. Economic background Russia’s economy is heavily dependent on oil and gas exports, and with Europe becoming more and more reliant on imported fuels, the prospects for Russian industry should be […]

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