There is no ‘War on Terror’

There is no war on terror, says Britain’s Director of Public Prosecutions, Ken Macdonald. What we have instead is a crime prevention exercise, albeit one in thwarting the actions of psychopathic killers, and bringing them to justice: “London is not a battlefield. Those innocents who were murdered on July 7 2005 were not victims of […]

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Saving the world from religious idiocy?

This article was published on the Guardian’s Comment is Free website on 12 January 2007. It will take a lot more than shouting at the radio to defeat the forces of darkness and superstition. On Tuesday evening there gathered in protest in central London a few hundred Christian fundamentalists, together with a small number of […]

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Human rights and potential in handicapped people

This article was published on the Guardian’s Comment is Free website on 8 January 2007. Ashley’s parents may have been acting out of love and compassion, but they have denied her the opportunity to reach her full potential. I once worked in a residential care home for men and women with severe mental handicap. Most […]

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Health and safety in nanotechnology

The Wilson Center’s Andrew Maynard on the way forward With billions invested annually in research and development, and an industry in rapid expansion, relatively little attention has been paid so far to the impact of nanomaterials on the environment and health. With this in mind, an international team of experts led by Andrew Maynard*, Science […]

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Samsung vs. the regulators

Samsung’s use of silver nanoparticles in a new washing machine faces opposition from water regulators and environmentalists. Korean firm Samsung’s introduction of a washing machine that uses silver nanoparticles as an antibacterial agent has led in two European countries to consumer opposition and complaints from official regulators. The product also looks likely to run into […]

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Carbon nanotubes pass in-vivo test

Tests show that carbon nanoparticles injected into the bloodstream of laboratory animals are rapidly expelled from the system. While there has been some research done into the health consequences of ingesting nanoparticles, much of the public discussion extrapolates from known problems due to dusty substances such as asbestos fibres. We know that a mass of […]

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Silver does more than kill bacteria

If you came to this article via LloydWright.org, please note that its publication by Lloyd Wright is an infringement of my copyright. The republication of the article in full was done without my permission, and Lloyd Wright is refusing to pay me a retrospective syndication fee. I am currently seeking legal advice on how to […]

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Detecting viruses with nanotech-aided spectroscopy

Detecting viral infections normally requires that blood or tissue samples be taken from suspected carriers and analysed in pathology labs. This takes considerable time, but such delays may soon be a thing of the past owing to a novel diagnostic test developed by researchers at the University of Georgia, and detailed in a recent issue […]

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Nanotechnology at the cutting edge

Nanotechnology may not be as new as we like to think. At least, not if Peter Paufler and his colleagues at Dresden University are right, and carbon nanotubes are to be found in ancient Saracen sabres from Damascus. The Damascene blades are made of a type of steel known as wootz, which was first made […]

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Nanotech workers may be exposed to health risks

Workers in nanotechnology-related industries may be exposed to occupational health risks, says Andrew Maynard, chief scientific advisor to the Project on Emerging Nanotechnologies. In an article published in the Annals of Occupational Hygiene, entitled “Nanotechnology: the next big thing, or much ado about nothing?”, Maynard writes: “The presence of engineered nanomaterials in the workplace today […]

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